Collection of the Negatives (The Blood Rising Book 1)

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Publication Date: January 11th, 2019
Genre: Sci-fi/ New Adult
In a world with skyrocketing inflation and unemployment, blood has become the new commodity, and the rarer your blood type, the more it’s worth.
After losing her job and watching her savings dwindle, Liri is persuaded by a resourceful friend to sell her blood to ABO Blood Group, where she learns she is O Negative, the most valuable and sought after blood.
Unable to afford living in New York City, Liri reluctantly decides to move back home and live with her parents, but her plan is interrupted when a virus is maliciously unleashed onto the island of Manhattan, resulting in a citywide quarantine. Before being able to devise an alternative plan, she is secretly informed of a covert mission by ABO to evacuate Negatives out of NYC. Although reluctant to trust them, it’s her only viable choice to stay alive, but unbeknown to Liri, she and the Negatives are vital to activating opposing agendas on Earth and beyond.

If you think this may sound like a book for you, you can add it to your Goodreads here.

Excerpt:

Descension

I weave through morning commuters and camped-out homeless people like a crochet needle to catch the train south to Times Square.  On rainy, late-fall days like today, the underground is hot, crowded, and emits a foul stench that forces you to breathe through your mouth.  The tracks shriek as the train comes to a halt. The steel doors open and a swarm of urbanites exits onto the platform. I stand to the left side of the door, waiting for an opportunity to squeeze in, as it’s too early for Monday-morning shoving matches. I slide in, finding cramped standing room between a perspiring, heavyset man and a teenage boy whose urban music I can hear blasting through his earphones. An automated announcement comes over the speaker system as the doors close.

“November is Concerned Citizens Month. The City of New York asks that you know your neighbors and colleagues. If you believe someone is jeopardizing the safety of our city, state, or country, it is your duty to report it, or you will be aiding in domestic terror. Become a concerned citizen; our safety depends on it.”

My Review:

First off I had never heard of someone writing a sci-fi book that used blood types as part of the premise. That’s when I knew I had to give this a read. It’s quite fast-paced the moment the ‘action’ begins, I can’t say more about when it picks up, I would hate to give away spoilers. Liri is interesting, I also like how she was afraid of needles, mostly because it’s such a normal fear to have and it’s always nice when an author remembers the normal traits people have.

You aren’t sure how it’s going to involve the blood type and there are hints but once you get them leaving New York ideas really begin to form. Also, the twists are not ones that I saw coming! If you like Sci-Fi but something that’s not always giving you a bit too much jargon, I would say this is a great pick. [I love the jargon because it’s a big yay for learning new science terms, but sometimes it’s annoying to have to pause the story to look things up]

The group of those evacuated from Manhatten eventually end up on an island, it seems like paradise, it’s perfect, they’re far away from the virus and anything they could ever wish is provided for. So why does Liri suspect something more behind this facade of paradise? I’ll let you find out on your own, but, let me tell you, that ending was a doozy so be prepared, it’ll leave you wanting to jump right into the next book, but unfortunately for us, we’ll have to be patient and wait.

Issues that I had were more to do with just wanting things to be more developed. I know this is NA for its target audience, but I thought it felt more like YA at times, which, I mean that wasn’t really a big issue for me, just something I noted while reading.

Overall it was a really fun read and I’m curious as to what happens next!

**I received this book in exchange for my honest review as part of participation in this Blog Tour**

Links Where You Can Purchase This Book:

Amazon

iBooks

Kobo

Barnes & Noble

About the Author:

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Violet St. Karl’s love affair with science fiction and fantasy began at the tender age of four when she first saw Star Wars: Return of the Jedi, but nearly three decades passed before she started transferring the stories in her head onto the computer screen. Unbeknownst to Violet at the time of signing her lease, her Upper West Side apartment was the former site of Edgar Allen Poe’s old farmhouse, where he completed writing the Raven. However, she didn’t begin writing until receiving another sign from the universe a year later. While spending extensive time in Barcelona, she learned her flat once belonged to Mercè Rodoreda i Gurguí, a famous Catalan writer, an indication that living in the former residences of famous dead authors was no coincidence, but a sign to start writing.
After over a decade in New York, Violet recently returned to her roots in the Detroit area where is an advocate and proud Ambassador of the Authors Guild.  When not writing or focused on strengthening the local literary community, she is planning which country to explore next.

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Giveaway!

Click on the link below to be directed to the giveaway and have a chance to win this paperback copy and at home blood typing kit!

 a Rafflecopter giveaway

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Rest of the Blog Tour Schedule:

 

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April 22nd
Reads & Reels (Review) https://readsandreels.com/
B is for Book Review (Interview) https://bforbookreview.wordpress.com
Jessica Rachow (Review) http://jessicarachow.wordpress.com
I Smell Sheep (Excerpt) http://www.ismellsheep.com/
April 23rd
The Caffeinated Reader (Review) https://www.thecaffeinatedreader.com
Tranquil Dreams (Review) https://klling.wordpress.com/
Scarlett Readz and Runz (Excerpt) https://scarlettreadzandrunz.com/
April 24th
Breakeven Books (Excerpt) https://breakevenbooks.com
A Full Time Nerd (Review) http://afulltimenerd.com
Daily Waffle (Excerpt) http://www.dailywaffle.co.uk
April 25th
Pages and Paw Prints (Review) http://pagesandpawprints.com/
Afire Pages (Review) http://www.afirepages.wordpress.com
Banshee Irish Horror Blog (Review) www.bansheeirishhorrorblog.com
April 26th
Port Jerricho (Review) http://www.aislynndmerricksson.com
Eclectic Review (Review) https://eclecticreview.com/
J Bronder Book Reviews (Review) https://jbronderbookreviews.com/

 

Blog Tour Organized By
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R&R Book Tours
Link: http://rrbooktours.com

The Crying Machine eARC Review

Hey guys, I know, two reviews in a row. I have a good reason though! This book’s publish birthday is tomorrow AND I have BESpring19 posts to do cause the other hosts were on point with their prompts and I wanna do so many.


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GoodReads Blurb: 

A sharp, lyrical thriller of power, religion, and artificial intelligence.

The world has changed, but Jerusalem endures. Overlooked by new superpowers, the Holy City of the future is a haven of spies and smugglers, exiles and extremists.

A refugee with strange technological abilities searches for a place to disappear.

An ambitious young criminal plots the heist that could make or destroy him.

A corrupt minister harnesses the power of the past in a ruthless play for complete control.

And the wheels of another plan – as old and intricate as the city itself – begin to turn…

I’ll be honest, I was hesitant after the first chapter, wondering what I’d gotten myself into but I kept on and the other chapters were still a bit ‘hmm’ for me until about 30 pages in and then it all just clicked, Chivers had me hooked.

The premise was already right up my alley, Sci-Fi/Dystopia and I’m always a sucker for books about AI (or movies or anything else lol).

Clementine is a nugget and I want to protect her with all my heart and hiss at anyone who gets near her.

But, not to go crazy and mention a whole bunch of names that will mean nothing to you all, let’s start small.

The story switches between three characters, each chapter is told in the first person and no two chapters in a row are from the same perspective/character. The characters are Silas, Levi, and Clementine who I’ve already mentioned. It’s fun to have the perspective go from one of the ‘good guys’ to the corrupt minister and I really enjoyed that. The story is set in Jerusalem and I like that the reason it is, is because the Mechanicals/Machines have taken over Europe and the US. This means that the people coming to Jerusalem from those people are mostly refugees and that’s a pretty interesting take. As this is set in the future, Jerusalem’s history is mentioned but nothing is in depth on it, which is pretty good for this particular book, I applaud Chivers on balancing that well enough. He doesn’t try to write about what he doesn’t know as far as setting the book in a different country goes and that’s always a nice and refreshing thing, and his own take remains in our futuristic world he’s built.

I would have enjoyed more of his world building for this dystopia setting and that was probably my biggest let down in this novel. But this is more character driven and not only that but the plot doesn’t need you to know more than what he gives.

Overall this book really touched on humanity, showing an AI hybrid what it means to be human, and along the way perhaps a few others learn the meaning too [such as our ambitious criminal] and though there is talk about religion it’s not to shove it in your face, it’s part of the ties to the past and I really LOVED that there is a religion based off worshipping machines, and not to mention God is referred to with she/her in this so, I’m already like ‘damn straight’ lol.

The minor characters were interesting as well and I can say Yusuf and Amos were my favorites in that regard but I won’t give away too many details.

Really loved this and was so satisfied when I finished, it was an unexpected favorite for me.

Time for the breakdown.

Pros:
– Future with intricate levels of technology incorporated into humans.
– Insightful, makes you think about what humanity means in the world this book is set
– Clementine is a wonderful nugget
– Religion is interesting in this day and age but it doesn’t shove it in your face constantly
– Character depth in small and unexpected ways
– You get to see the point of view of the bad guy, pretty fun
– Jerusalem is the place where people flee, and I love that mechanicals are not fond of it, machines do not love sand, and Europe and the US are paying for the advanced technology that US brought upon the world

Cons:
– First few chapters are a little awkward
– At first, the setting isn’t what it seems, it’s not so sci-fi and dystopia that you can clearly read that the first couple of chapters. [Personally, I liked that after I got over the little hump]
– Sometimes you just didn’t want to switch POVs so much
– Not enough background information which may affect someone’s enjoyment of the book.

[***I received this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.***]

Ready Player One Review

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Hey Everyone! So, another review, I know, so many this week, it makes for a boring read. I’m sorry! But I’ll have a different sort of post tomorrow! I just really wanted to finish this so I could focus on my eARCs. [Especially Descendant of the Crane] Not to mention I really wanted to see what was going to happen next. I would say if I was giving it a harder look I’d give it a half instead of full rating on my last planet. And that’s because of a few issues that really just kind of kept jumping out at me. So, know, I enjoyed this 4/5 but I’m giving it 3.5/5 on this review so I can point out the flaws I think are important to note.

So here we go again, me being a cynic, but Parzival and Art3mis just didn’t gel well for me. I just feel like Art3mis felt more animosity than affection which is within her right all the way, but, it doesn’t make for a great romance when it’s like that through like 89% of the book.

Aech was definitely my favorite, I mean, hands down as their avatar and in real life, Helen was amazing. I also felt it was heartbreaking that in order to do well in even a virtual reality world, Helen became Aech and hid the color of her skin. But, the reasoning is sadly logical from the point of where her Mother was coming from in advising her to do that.

I freakin loved the 80s references, I’m an 80s baby which means my early life is plagued by 80s, and even now my hair naturally looks like I’m from an 80s hairspray commercial, which is…sad, but you know, what you can do. My nickname at Uni was Flashdance (no, I didn’t strip, I just like to wear legwarmers, probably could have paid off debt if I had decided to strip.)

But, let me break this down in my usual style.

Pros:
– 80s, 80s everywhere
– The connection of living a slightly isolated life made me feel for the protagonist and his buds more.
– There is a sharp hint of today’s society in that our world is crumbling around us and we are seeking refuge in the only places we can. So good job Cline, and this has only gotten even more realistic since published in 2011.
– The OASIS is awesome, and I love the idea of having haptic chairs that can move and the treadmills as well, it makes for a much better visual of what it was like when you were reading
– Halliday at the beginning was amazing in his video to announce the contest, it made me want to go watch a Hughes movie
– Art3mis really kicked butt and was super smart (as long as we kept her away from Parzival where she then became either catty or mushy and it was, see this listed in the cons)
– Aech is a better friend than Parzival deserves
– It really captured how helpless the poor would have felt and once more it made sense why people would run to the Oasis.
– I loved that the red button at the end.
– Ogden was amazing, he has a dance club, let’s think about that, he loves to go jamming and DJing still.
– Did I mention 80s references galore?

Cons:
-Parzival should have known how much the IOI were capable of, so I get angry that he put himself in such a dumb situation. This isn’t so much a con as me venting lol.
– Halliday being in love with Kira was such an eye roller, BUT I have to give credit, he didn’t tell Ogden or try to steal her, he just brooded in silence so that was nice.
– This didn’t need romance from the High Five peeps at all, this probably would have been a solid 4/5 without Parzival and Art3mis.
– ^ The romance also takes away from Art3mis being badass, and Parzival is useless in love, so, I’m glad Art3mis was stronger than him.
– We could have had more of Aech
– There were some distasteful jokes I didn’t care for.
– Uh…what was with very stereotyped and hyperfocus look at our two Japanese characters who we barely got to know but my god, Cline wanted you to be sure they were ‘really’ Japanese when they were in the book. Probably my biggest issue. It’s a vast culture, why pinpoint it to some small parts? Not to mention with all the Japanese pop culture references, there should have been more of them in general.
– I could have used more of Wade realizing just how lonely his life was outside the OASIS and what that exactly meant.

Toodles!

Off Planet eARC Review


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GoodReads Blurb: In an all-too-plausible future where corporate conglomerates have left the world’s governments in shambles, anyone with means has left the polluted Earth for the promise of a better life on a SpaceTech owned colony among the stars.

Maité Martinez is the daughter of an Earther Latina and a powerful Aunare man, an alien race that SpaceTech sees as a threat to their dominion. When tensions turn violent, Maité finds herself trapped on Earth and forced into hiding.

For over ten years, Maité has stayed hidden, but every minute Maité stays on Earth is one closer to getting caught.

She’s lived on the streets. Gone hungry. And found a way to fight through it all. But one night, while waitressing in a greasy diner, a customer gets handsy with her. She reacts without thinking.

Covered in blood, Maité runs, but it’s not long before SpaceTech finds her…

Arrested and forced into dangerous work detail on a volcano planet, Maité waits for SpaceTech to make their move against the Aunare. She knows that if she can’t somehow find a way to stop them, there will be an interstellar war big enough to end all life in the universe.

There’s only one question: Can Maité prevent the total annihilation of humanity without getting herself killed in the process?

Maité Martinez is half human, half Aunare, a Latina Aunare who has grown up hiding her background and constantly having to cover her tracks. Even with life in Albuquerque being stable enough, a job as a waitress, volunteer teacher at a gym and a Crew that consist of some of the only people she trusts. Unfortunately, Maité isn’t just a half Earther/half Aunare, her father is someone that SpaceTech would love to goad into a catastrophic game of war.

Not only that but SpaceTech has a different plan for Maité, instead of giving her the same punishment as other half Earthers, she’s sent to the planet Abbadon. The question is, can Maité survive long enough to try and thwart SpaceTech’s plans, and will she be able to help her friends and family?

Honestly, I found Maité so relatable, she’s a young woman thrown into a world where she’s struggling to survive and that’s it, that’s her goal, sure, in the end, she wants to do more but at the very start, we have someone who is trying to just survive. Her Father is a very important Aunare but she has no memory of him after Liberation week (when all the Aunare were shunned by Earthers, but I won’t go too much into that and give it away). All Maité knows is that he’s alive out there and that her Mother and her hope to someday be free of Earth with possibly reuniting with him.

People can show incredible strength when faced with adversity and Maité shows just that, I was so impressed by her throughout the book, and I loved the people who helped her along the way, not to mention there’s Declan the human who she trusts and enters her life as everything goes crazy and then there’s Lorne an Aunare who she’s not sure how she’s connected to other than he knows her and is close to her father.

This has been my best sci-fi read in a while and I loved that it was not only YA but that Maité was half Latina, it made me so happy ❤

Erin does a great job of world building with Abaddon and I cannot wait to see who she expands her universe in book 2. Though I definitely would never want to go to Abaddon lolol. She also does a spectacular job of making Maité more than just a slightly ‘alien’ looking human, her body is different and therefore reacts differently to human things and that is a breath of fresh air as sometimes people forget their aliens are NOT humans. The attention to detail is there and I loved it. And you can’t help but feel for Maité for all she goes through and all she’s willing to go through to prevent a war between the humans and Aunare. Not to mention she’s lost and dealing with finding herself and being comfortable with who and what she is and the changes she’s faced with.

Trigger warning: Sexual assault, violence, extreme pain.

Pros:
-Kick ass Latina-Aunare protagonist
– Humanoid alien race that is still different enough from humans to be interesting especially in their internal workings
– Strength in more ways than one, not just physically but emotionally and not just from our Maité but from those around her
– Not all humans are evil, and there’s such a great level of trust between Maité and those that become her friends in New Mexico and Abaddon.
– Amazing platonic male best friend (Roan) who does not turn into part of a love triangle!
– There’s still the hint of a love triangle trope between Maité and two others if you love that trope!
– YA Sci-Fi (something we always need more of!)
– Some very cool fight scenes
– The antagonists aren’t there much as individual characters but man do you hate them!

Cons:
-Not enough Roan
– You may hate that there’ll probably be a love triangle
– It may be hard to read all Maité goes through (most of it is just pushing past physical and emotional endurance, which is traumatic for her and you feel for her)
– The Aliens could have been more alien but I thought Erin did well by making them human enough looking that you’d believe mating between species was possible
– Uh, there could have been more cool space flying but I’m not gonna complain -too much-
– You will have to wait until 2020 to read more lol

** I received this book from the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for my honest review, and I truly did love this book and if you love YA/Sci-fi, I recommend you give it a try and hope you enjoy it! **

 

My Top 5 YA Dystopia Picks!

Here we go, guys! My top 5 YA Dystopia picks!

My Classic 5 Dystopia picks can be found here.

5. Across the Universe

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Beth Revis’s Across the Universe trilogy has such a neat plot, I mean yes a lot of Dystopian novels have the same elements [that’s why I love them] but I loved that this one’s setting was on a freakin ship! Best of both worlds; more sci-fi and all Dystopia! My only issues were with the style of writing, sometimes it was just a bit too awkward how she wrote the dialogue and the feelings were a little too well controlled at times for our lovely protagonist. I would say this has the lowest rating on my top 5 only because of this, otherwise, I really do enjoy it!

4. Matched

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Condie’s Matched trilogy is not only on my top 5 but it’s one of the few series that I love to reread. This is the one that Eden Chip reminded me of a bit [no spoilers though] where science/statistics is used to give you the most compatible partner, but what if there was a glitch and you knew? What if there was someone else who could have been it? I really loved how she set it up and it was so chillingly good, had a bit of an echo of The Giver in it as well to me. The turmoil the characters go through is always one that tugs on my heartstrings a lot and is one of the reasons I reread it. It’s got your typical love triangle trope but I think it does a great job of the nuances of feelings people go through in said love triangle. I could go on forever about this, but I’ll refrain and move on.

3.  The Uglies

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I have loved The Uglies trilogy since it came out, and yes there is a fourth book in the series but it’s not connected to the characters…at all…and even the issues in it don’t really connect…so…I don’t connect it to the first three. Think about it! A world where beauty is valued over everything [sound a little familiar? Lol] and once you finally hit 16 you’re no longer an ‘ugly’ someone who has kept their natural appearances, you get to become a ‘pretty’ you’re made into a beautiful person…..so what happens if you don’t go through with it? Is there anyone else left aside from the pretties and uglies?

2. The Giver

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I loved this book and not to mention it was my first dystopian novel and I didn’t realize it! I read this in elementary when it was still new! Now, I’ve not said The Giver series as I’ve said with the others because frankly, I haven’t read the others yet, this was shown as a standalone novel for so long I didn’t even realize it was a series! So! I have to get to that but, I still think it works great as a standalone. A world with suppressed emotions and colors, where people are picked to give birth, others picked to raise those children, everything neat and tidy, and then the role of the Giver is given to a young boy who seeks answers and finds out more than he bargained for. LOVE IT.

1. The Hunger Games

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And finally, The Hunger Games trilogy. Another one I love to reread. I think Suzanne Collins does such a freakin precise representation of how corrupt power can be the most deadly tool of all. Yes we all know that, but look at it, it happens today, people pull strings, they show you news to distract you from other news, they use stories to cover up the darkness they don’t always want us to see. Not to mention I love Katniss, the love triangle in this is fun for me. Katniss doesn’t care about love triangles, she cares about food. Tell me I’m wrong. Not to mention she doesn’t do her actions with the intent to start a rebellion, it happens and she takes on the mantle, and not always because she wants to. Ugh. Another one I could gush over all day.

Okay, there you have it, my top 5 YA dystopian novels/series! I’m currently over halfway through Dead Man’s Blues so hopefully, I’ll be reviewing that soon! But I do have a lot going on this week, two more rehearsals, a concert, and then another concert next Sunday too, so, I’ll try to keep up every day!

Toodles, guys!

My Top 5 CLASSIC Dystopia Picks!

I’ve decided to divide this by Classics and YA, I couldn’t lump them all together and pick from them all as it’s one of my favorite genres after all! So here we go! [Next week I’ll do my favorite YA dystopia picks!]

5. 1984

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Big Brother is watching, guys, and I love this book. Now, I wouldn’t say it was the best Dystopia novel of that era but it was still impactful and well, still is today. This isn’t the sort of novel where you come out with a happy ending and I think that’s one of the reasons I love dystopia, you never know what sort of ending you’ll get. Our protagonist finds love in a world where he’s one of the few not to be brainwashed into loving Big Brother, and where independent thinking isn’t allowed, more than that it really just doesn’t happen.

4. The Handmaid’s Tale

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I cannot sing Atwood’s praises enough on this. She took something most other authors just didn’t even conceive of, writing this tale with a female perspective (and not just because Atwood’s female, but because her protagonist is) this one actually made me uncomfortable to read because in truth I felt that it hit too close to home, this was all too probable when you see how much power others have over women’s bodies. Not to mention we now have an amazing show because of it and Atwood is involved with it. Rumor is she’s going to maybe write a sequel.

3. Anthem

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Admittedly I haven’t read this or a couple of others since 10th grade which was a very long time ago but I remember this being the only Ayn Rand book I actually liked. Now don’t get me wrong she writes with a power that is undeniable but I utterly hated Atlas Shrugged, I still have nightmares about it though I hear good things about The Fountainhead which is now on my list. Anyway, I have a funny feeling George Orwell may have gotten a few ideas from Ayn, where in her book Equality 7-2521 dares to dream of individualism and to love the woman that he chooses. It’s great and fast-paced, and just imagine, she published in 1938!

2. Fahrenheit 451

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My man! Ray Bradbury!! I freakin’ LOVE The Halloween Tree (admittedly love the movie more but he had a hand in that as well so I don’t feel guilty about that). But before I loved The Halloween Tree, I loved Fahrenheit 451. This actually reminds of things that have happened before and seem just so plausible to happen again, we have our Firefighter Montag who burns books that are forbidden. But he finds himself wondering, thanks to the question of another, what’s in the books he burns? Montag never questioned it before it was his job and he just did it, but what if he peeked into those forbidden tomes? Honestly how easy is it to imagine a world where instead of seeking out knowledge we easily if not eagerly destroy it? (No matter the form it comes in)

1. Brave New World

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I’ve read this at least twice, there may have been a third time during pregnancy but we’ll contribute memory loss to foggy prego-brain. This book rattled me to my core. This world seemed so foreign and scary to me the first time I read it when I was in middle school. Now though, it is ten times scarier and not nearly as foreign. We watch politics going crazy all over the world, people so scared that they are angry and ready for something easy to take away all the pain. And the ending, the reaction I had the first time I read it has never left me, I still feel that same reaction every time.

That’s the thing with all these dystopia novels, no matter if they’re classic or YA, they’re all so plausible in a world that’s so full of turmoil. Whether it’s a world where we only live for pleasure, one that takes away the core of our individualism, or one that takes away the complications of emotions that plague us.

There we go my 5 favorite Dystopia classics, I do plan on doing some more dystopia reading this year of both old and new so who knows what this list will look like by 2020!

 

 

Eden Chip

I know yesterday was three mini-reviews, but last night I started another reader copy and now that I’ve finished, I’m going to write this while it’s still fresh.


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I thought this was a very good sci-fi/dystopia read. I loved the use of chips and how there was always a blurred line to using them, is it okay is it not? I mean you think it’s not okay but once humanity had destroyed itself what choice did they have in this world? But it went too far and it’s on Raissa, Caleb, and Christian to save the world. I really enjoyed the feel of it. and I never thought I’d say this but the reason it didn’t get 4 stars is that it was actually a little too fast-paced; in that I mean it was hard to accept some things that happened as it all happens in the span of a few days. Perfect syncing data or not, love needs to be more slow-burning for this old cynic!

Scott Cramer did a great job with the plot and Christian was by far my favorite character (and also the one I most wanted to kick in the first 30%). He had a lot of complexities and I really admired Raissa’s strength -I mean literal strength, the girl is a tank-, Cramer didn’t make flowery descriptions of her, and he gave her so many cool fight scenes. Also, kudos to having violists, having 2 in one book was the most unbelievable aspect to this whole dystopia novel lol [amiright?].

The first chapter did have me a little iffy because I wondered if this would lose my interest but by chapter 2 I figured this was going to be a book I would want to finish. But be forewarned this sort of novel is the stuff I enjoy reading, it’s like crack to me lol for all I know it’s got Dickensian sentence structure and enough tropes to fill a YA supernatural academy book [I shall not name names].

Raissa has been trained as a rebel, I mean she has spent most of her life, after losing her parents and brother at 6, training to perform one mission. When the time finally comes, it’s nice to see the emotion she displays at having to leave her Grandfather, it reminds you that she’s human. She’s half-French, half-Egyptian I think he states in the novel and from Jerusalem (that’s her on the cover, I’m super concerned by the lack of tan or freckles she’s gotten from living in that sort of geographical setting lol). But still, it’s nice to have a character in this sort of novel that’s not from the U.S.A. Her mission is deadly and has only one possible outcome, she dies so humanity lives in freedom but the reality of what is being planned by the man known as Petrov is something she nor her partner could anticipate.

Caleb is her target, you’ll see for what if you read it, I’ll not spoil anything, but he’s on the side of Petrov, he likes the chips, they keep you from dealing with horrible unproductive emotions and he believes Petrov knows what’s best for humanity. But something happens to plant a seed of doubt.

Lastly, we have my favorite, Christian. He is an older man, he remembers what it was like before chips, but more importantly how does he know so much about the M-Code which is responsible for all the chips do?

Overall this is a solid read and I’m glad I picked it up, I really wasn’t able to put it down once I started it. Anyone looking for an awesome YA steeped in sci-fi with a different sort of dystopia feel might find this worth a quick read.

***I received an advance review copy for free, and I am leaving this review voluntarily.*** [I really enjoy how Booksiren makes you say that you left it voluntarily as if maybe Scott Cramer’s got a stun gun to me, ‘Come on Haley! Write that review, and make it look good!’]

Also, because I’m extra, here’s an article about MIT researchers about an AI chip that could be implanted in us for mobile devices.