The Cursed Key Blog Tour

 

 

TheCursedKey (1).jpg

Hot_ChocolateHot_ChocolateHot_ChocolateHot_Chocolate

Blurb:
A forgotten past, a dark mage, and an unyielding curse.
Another team beat free-spirited archaeologist Olivia Perez to the dig of a lifetime, and now she’s left with the choice to wait for scraps or brave a dangerous, dusty tomb in hopes of finding other priceless artifacts. Her reward? A mysterious key she has no idea is cursed. Soon, Olivia realizes she’s brought home more than just an ancient rarity.
Malevolent visions begin to plague her. Unnerved by what they reveal, she casts away the key…unknowingly placing it into the waiting hands of a dark mage bent on destruction. Only when a shifter agent from the Paranormal Intelligence and Tracking Organization arrives searching for the key does Olivia realize what a huge mistake she’s made. 
Forced to team up with the ill-tempered shifter, her journey to reclaim the cursed key leads down a twisting path of dark histories, dangerous magic, and deadly obstacles. But Olivia’s efforts to take back the ancient relic before the dark mage can destroy the lives of humans, shifters, witches, and fae alike are thwarted by her own dark past…and a price steeper than what she’s willing to pay.
Fans of Tomb Raider and Ilona Andrews will love the blend of urban fantasy, magical adventure, and paranormal romance in THE CURSED KEY from Miranda Brock and New York Times bestselling author Rebecca Hamilton!
Book Details:
The Cursed Key
by Miranda Brock & Rebecca Hamilton
(The Cursed Key Trilogy #1)
Published by: Evershade Publishing
Publication date: January 14th 2020
Genres: New Adult, Romance, Urban Fantasy
GoodReads

Purchase Link

Amazon | B&N | iBooks | Kobo | Google Play

My Review

This was such a fun read! It’s one of those books while it didn’t have anything that ‘blew me away’ it definitely was enjoyable and filled with things I like. Adventure, a hint of romance, paranormal beings, magic, and a very Indiana Jones/Tomb Raider vibe going on.

Olivia is an archaeologist, she has wandered into the jungle, hoping to find something the other excavating teams haven’t yet, and that’s when her world gets turned upside down.

She finds a key, and suddenly I’m reminiscent of the curse of the mummy King Tut, what seems like just plain bad luck is more than that, she’s plagued with visions and it has nothing to do with heat fatigue from the climate as they persist after she returns home.

The whole time Olivia and the reader are unsure of who she is, you know there is something different to her, the mage she runs into proves as much, but, you don’t know what.

Has the key given her magical powers or was she born with them and they’ve been hiding?

I loved the mystery to Olivia and really thought the banter between her and her shifter friend was cute and fun.

The romance is slow burn which is a favorite of mine and though the book did keep me interested I felt that the magic system and worldbuilding could have used more focus. I am hoping that is rectified in book 2 as I definitely intend on reading the next one.

Again, a solid read, nothing incredible, but definitely fun and worth a snoop!

Thank you to Xpresso Tours for an eARC of this to read and review honestly as part of the blog tour.

ButtonXBT (1).png

Giveaway

Tour-wide giveaway (US Only)

A Kindle + $50 Amazon Gift Card
Rafflecopter Link Here

About the Authors

Rebecca.jpg

New York Times bestselling author Rebecca Hamilton writes urban fantasy and paranormal romance for Harlequin, Baste Lübbe, and Evershade. A book addict, registered bone marrow donor, and indian food enthusiast, she often takes to fictional worlds to see what perilous situations her characters will find themselves in next. 
Represented by Rossano Trentin of TZLA, Rebecca has been published internationally, in three languages: English, German, and Hungarian.

Author Links
Website | Facebook | Twitter

 

Miranda.jpg

From an early age Miranda Brock has always loved fantasy and adventure everything. Since she doesn’t live in a world of enchanting powers, mythical beasts, and things unbelievable she has decided to write about them. (Although, if you happen to see a dragon flying around, do tell her.) Born in southern Illinois, where she still resides with her husband and two children, she grew up running through the woods, playing in creeks, and riding horses. What started out as writing poetry grew into short stories and eventually led to her first novel, Souls Discovered. Miranda lives in the country where she finds inspiration in the simplicity and beauty around her. With the help of a ridiculous amount of coffee and some good music she writes whenever she gets a chance.

Author Links

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads

 

The Rest of the Tour

TheCursedKeyTourBanner.png[Click on Picture to be taken to Tour Schedule]

 

Dark Hollows – Blog Tour

 

Guys, guess what? I’m like 90% sure this is my last blog tour for the year unless I’ve forgotten something. Which I mean there’s like a 10% chance that I have forgotten something. Anyway, onto the tour!

 

Dark Hollows

Hot_ChocolateHot_ChocolateHot_ChocolateHot_ChocolateHot_Chocolate

GoodReads:
Jacob Reese enjoys the quiet life, running a coffee shop and renting out his cottage in The Hollows, Vermont.

But the calm is shattered when a woman who looks eerily similar to his ex-girlfriend Laura turns up to stay in the cottage, and leaves a mysterious note in the guest book.

Now Jacob’s seeing Laura everywhere—a glimpse of her face across the street, her music box left outside his house, a gift he gave her years before hanging from the trees.

But it can’t be Laura. Because Laura’s dead.

Someone knows Jacob’s secret—what really happened the night Laura died—and they’re out for revenge…

Book Information:
Author: Steve Frech
Publisher: HQ Digital
Format: eBook
Page Count: 384
Publication Date: December 6, 2019

My Review

Trigger Warning: This book contains violence/gore, and some jarring scenes.

I wasn’t sure that I could read any more favorite thrillers but it seems that I was proven wrong.

Dark Hollows was hands down one of the best thrillers I read this year. Frech knows how to keep you on the edge of your seat. I started it thinking ‘I’ll read a chapter or two before bed’ well, that ended up being a lie. I read the first 40% straight through in a sitting and had to force myself to put it down because it was past 1 am.

This book was INTENSE.

Jacob was the sort of character where you knew you shouldn’t feel sorry for him, but you did, at least a little. I mean he was like a worse version of John Wick.

That’s right. There’s a dog. But, in this scenario, the dog is kidnapped.

Jacob is trying to move on with his life after a dark and sordid incident from his past, but, the past doesn’t go away just because you want it to. Some things follow you. Especially if there’s the taint of revenge unfulfilled.

The pacing was excellent to the point whereas I’ve said, I had to force myself to put it down. It’s a wild ride from start to finish.

Jacob thinks he might be going crazy and the things that happen to him have you questioning everything at all times. And I love that.

The real question is, will Jacob have to pay for his past deeds? And just how much will he have to pay.

When does the past catch up?

Five out of five cups of coffee/hot chocolate. If you’re a thriller fan, I highly recommend this one!

 

About the Author

Steve grew up in… You know what? I hate writing stuff in the third person, so here it is:

I was born in East Chicago, Indiana. I grew up in the small town of Troy, OH.

I attended Miami University of Ohio and received a BFA in Theater. I moved to Los Angeles to pursue acting and writing but quickly discovered that I don’t like actors… Just kidding. I have a ton of actor friends and I love you all.

The Rest of the Tour

Dark Hollows Blog Tour Banner

The Woman with Wings – Blog Tour

9781911445760.jpg

Hot_ChocolateHot_ChocolateHot_ChocolateHot_Chocolate

GoodReads:
In this heart-warming tale of female empowerment, a young woman comes to terms with the revelation that she may be able to fly.

Alison Spedding is a loner; no real friends, no boyfriend and a job in which she goes unnoticed. At thirty-two, her only passion is birdwatching.

One afternoon, high on a Scottish mountain, earnestly waiting for the rarest of sights – a white tailed eagle returning to its nest – she slips, falling silently. In shock, her fellow twitchers return to the hostel to raise the alarm, heavy with the realisation that she must be dead. What they find shocks them even more. Alison is already there, alive and unscathed…

Further similar episodes cause Alison’s grip on reality to slip, her mind spiralling towards breaking point. In her dreams she sees a huge shadow on the ground, as if there was a creature above her, a creature with huge wings…

Her infatuated colleague Jed is concerned. Can he intervene before Alison finally loses control?

This is an extraordinary novel, exploring one woman’s identity whilst posing universal questions: Who is she? Where does she belong? And must she accept her fate, or can she spread her wings and be free at last?

My Review

Hi everyone, today I have the pleasure of reviewing ‘The Woman with Wings,’ I had read another book by our author MacManus, ‘Ike and Kay’ and enjoyed it, so I was interested to see what I would make of this one. Especially because they are two completely different novels in genre and even style of prose.

This is a contemporary novel with a slight fantasy twist, and one where the woman’s story is the only story versus the love story that was the historical fiction read of ‘Ike and Kay.’

Alison survived a fall that she shouldn’t have, and there’s no explanation for it. But the thing is, what if it’s the impossible that enabled her to survive her fall off a Scottish mountainside?

Aside from this looming question, we go on this journey with Alison to see how she changes after this event, not just in questioning the event itself, but in the direction she’s taking her own life. Stuck in the humdrum of the corporate world, an enthusiastic bird watcher such as Alison finds herself questioning her place in the world.

This is the heartwarming part of the tale, Alison finding herself, questioning what she wants and dealing with the crazy antics that seem to follow her about in the forms of coworkers, bosses, and more.

I loved her spirit in this, she was a great protagonist and her journey is one I extremely enjoyed.

There’s such a hilarious feel to the antics that Alison goes through, and where once she seemed to pass easily into obscurity, she now finds herself in the spotlight with some rather ridiculously funny characters. MacManus does a great job with the dark humour in this and he never gets so ridiculous that you lose sight of Alison’s personal struggles.

One reason I didn’t rate it higher was that I felt the pacing was a bit jarring at times, it felt uneven and at times struggled with the plot becoming a little too obscure. But, I still found it a very enjoyable read, and I thought it was such a nice change of pace compared to everything else I’ve read in the past couple of months.

MacManus is a talented writer, easily able to switch genres and writing styles completely and competently.

Thank you to Endeavour Quill for a copy of this in exchange for my honest opinion.

About the Author

James MacManus has worked in the newspaper business for 46 years. He is currently the Managing Director of the Times Literary Supplement.

He is the author of On the Broken Shore (The Language of the Sea, UK edition), and Ocean Devil: The Life and Legend of George Hogg which was made into a film starring Jonathan Rhys Meyers

His latest book, Black Venus, is a vivid novel of Charles Baudelaire and his lover Jeanne Duval, the Haitian cabaret singer who inspired his most famous and controversial poems, set in nineteenth-century Paris. Duckworth will publish the UK edition of Black Venus on February 27th 2014.The UK edition follows the successful launch of the novel in the US by Thomas Dunne books of New York.

Author Links

Twitter | Webpage

 

The Rest of the Tour

TWWW blog tour schedule.jpg

Ghoster – Blog Tour

 

 

Ghoster

ratingiconratingiconratingiconratingiconratingicon

GoodReads:
Jason Arnopp – author of acclaimed cult hit The Last Days of Jack Sparks – returns with a razor-sharp thriller for a social-media obsessed world. Prepare to never look at your phone the same way again . . .

Kate Collins has been ghosted.

She was supposed to be moving in with her new boyfriend Scott, but all she finds after relocating to Brighton is an empty apartment. Scott has vanished. His possessions have all disappeared.

Except for his mobile phone.

Kate knows she shouldn’t hack into Scott’s phone. She shouldn’t look at his Tinder, his calls, his social media. But she can’t quite help herself.

That’s when the trouble starts. Strange, whispering phone calls from numbers she doesn’t recognise. Scratch marks on the walls that she can’t explain. And the growing feeling that she’s being watched.

Kate refuses to leave the apartment – she’s not going anywhere until she’s discovered what happened to Scott. But the deeper she dives into Scott’s digital history the more Kate realises just how little she really knows about the man she loves.

 

My Review

Hands down this was the creepiest read of the year for me. Which is impressive because there were a couple of other creepy worthy reads but this one takes the gold.

Ghoster at first seems uncomplicated and completely un-spooky, just a woman who was ghosted by her boyfriend, er, suppose ex-boyfriend now, and is welcomed to the new home by finding this out.

The flat has been cleaned out, there’s no evidence of Kate’s boyfriend Scott ever living here. She does notice weird gouges on the door, but the only evidence to suggest Scott lived there is his phone she finds on the balcony.

So why would he leave behind his phone?

Kate wants answers, in a digital age where we tend to accept being Ghosted, Kate doesn’t. She made a large move, her things are arrived and so did she but to no one and an empty flat. So Kate’s decided she needs answers, simply for closure of course, and the only way to get them is by getting into Scott’s phone.

Any moral dilemma about the decision is overridden by the urge to have answers and with some trial and error, Kate gets into his phone.

So does she find her answers?

Wrong, she finds more questions.

There’s questionable pictures, creepy videos, and a locked diary app that could have the answers to all Kate’s questions. But is she digging herself in too deep?

Kate has a dark past with smartphones, this is a dangerous path to tread but one that’s necessary if she wants her answers.

But instead of answers, she’s left with more and more questions. And the question of what happened to Scott is becoming increasingly more dangerous.

Seriously, this book was so creepy towards the end, and that ending, holy cow that ending. I won’t spoil it for you but let’s just say it was completely worthy of such a creepy read.

I was tempted to sleep with the light on and maybe put some distance between my phone and I after reading this book.

Kate’s struggle with her own problems is really highlighted in this, and the dark path she goes down is incredibly realistic in terms of someone dealing with her sort of phone problem. She has the amazing support of her best friend but not even that can help the more embedded in the search she becomes. There’s this tension building in the book that does a great job of slowly making you more and more uncomfortable about the routes and paths Kate takes, and this complete sense of dread for her as the ending starts to loom in.

The creativity and chilling atmosphere of this book made me jump to rate it 5 cups of coffee, and if you all need me, just contact me by smoke signal from now on.

Thank you to Orbit Books and Compulsive Readers Tour for a copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion as part of the tour.

[I’m going to turn on all the lights and sit about sixty feet from my phone now.]

 

About the Author

Picture

 

Hello!  I’m a British author and scriptwriter, with a background in journalism.

​I’m the writer of the terrifying Orbit Books novel Ghoster, out October 2019. Before that, I wrote The Last Days Of Jack Sparks, the Lionsgate feature film Stormhouse, various Doctor Who things, a Friday The 13th novel and script-edited the 2012 Peter Mullan film The Man Inside. 

2018 saw me co-author the book Inside Black Mirror with Charlie Brooker and Annabel Jones.

Check out my collection of 30 interviews I did as a rock journalist, gathered in From The Front Lines Of Rock.

Author Links

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr | Youtube | Instagram

 

The Rest of the Tour

Ghoster Poster 23 Aug

 

The Pursuit of William Abbey – Blog Tour

 

 

image001

ratingiconratingiconratingiconratingiconratingicon

GoodReads:
A hauntingly powerful novel about how the choices we make can stay with us forever, by the award-winning author of The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August and 84K.

South Africa in the 1880s. A young and naive English doctor by the name of William Abbey witnesses the lynching of a local boy by the white colonists. As the child dies, his mother curses William.

William begins to understand what the curse means when the shadow of the dead boy starts following him across the world. It never stops, never rests. It can cross oceans and mountains. And if it catches him, the person he loves most in the world will die.

Gripping, moving, and utterly thought-provoking, this novel proves once again that Claire North is one of the most innovative voices in modern fiction.

 

My Review

Once more, my huge apologies for the late post, I’ve really just been bed ridden and cranky and sleeping when I’m not awake to be cranky.

But.

I got to read this book in between bits of my coughing and grumpiness and I did not expect the book to have such a profound effect on me, but it did.

Confession time this is the first time I’ve read a Claire North book [Or Webb or Griffin book] and so I went in with not knowing what to expect other than the basis of the book sounded SO intriguing.

William Abbey is a very complex character in his own emotions that he presents, but his actions are all driven by his reactions and instincts, it’s really great to have such an in depth character. You’re not meant to necessarily like Abbey but in learning his story, I think the important part is to understand him, to see why he made his choices for better or worse.

North doesn’t soften the aspects of colonialism that are rather prominent in this book and I loved that. For so long to stretch your empire was seen as a noble thing, one used to justify almost anything, but even then not everyone would have seen it as noble, some knew, whether they admitted it or not, that it was wrong. An abuse of power and an abuse on fellow humans in the worst atrocities.

Abbey was a product of this time, not to justify what he did and didn’t do, just that you learn that some people were simply not strong enough in mind or heart to do the right thing when it was so easy to just let things happen.

For Abbey this results in him being cursed and now, well, his eyes are open and he’s left to continually travel the world in trying to outrun his curse.

Others see his curse as a gift, whether they are cursed or not, and some, those who have so long abused power in their noble works for the empire see it as a gift that THEY can use.

I would say though this story had a lot of tragedy in it, it also held hope, even if hope wasn’t always the truth that people like Abbey, a truth-speaker, could know without a doubt.

While Abbey is cursed to flee from his shadow, it’s never far and carries the weight of the truth of it, and if it catches up to him….someone he loves will die. But Abbey is not the only one to have this ‘affliction’ and I loved that we got to see how even power could try and corrupt and use such a personal curse for its own uses.

There’s a lot of great moments in this book, twists and turns of the human heart that I didn’t expect and honestly every page gave me something to think about.

A stupendous read that crosses over the genres of historical fiction, fantasy, and more.

I think it’s certainly worth the read and North’s prose is easily read with a sort of eloquence that makes it flow rather quickly. So despite the length of the book, it seems to fly by as Abbey shares his story with Sister Ellis.

I would say hands down this was one of the best reads of the year for me, I’d put it up there with some of my favorites now and I feel so incredibly lucky to have had the chance to read this.

It’s just a story about the complexity of humans and their nature, and it’s not always pretty, but it is honest and raw and there is a certain beauty in that.

Five cups of coffee from me, I’m off to go sleep more. Thank you so much to Orbit and Compulsive Readers Tour for a chance to read and review this honestly as part of the blog tour.

About the Author

Catherine’s first novel, Mirror Dreams, was completed when she was 14 years old. The book was published in 2002 and garnered comparisons with Terry Pratchett and Philip Pullman. She went on to publish a further seven young adult novels under her own name, earning her extensive critical acclaim and two Carnegie nominations for her novels Timekeepers and The Extraordinary and Unusual Adventures of Horatio Lyle.
While studying International History at the London School of Economics, she wrote an urban fantasy series for adults, writing as Kate Griffin. On graduating LSE she went to the Royal Academy for Dramatic Arts to study Technical Theatre and Stage Management. Throughout her training she continued to write, and while working as a lighting technician at the Royal National Theatre wrote her first Claire North novel, The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August, which became a word-of-mouth bestseller and was shortlisted for the Arthur C. Clarke Award. The follow-up Touch was described by the Independent as ‘little short of a masterpiece’, and her next novel The Sudden Appearance of Hope won the 2017 World Fantasy Award for Best Novel. Her recent novel The End of the Day was shortlisted for the 2017 Sunday Times/PFD Young Writer of the Year Award, and her latest book, 84K has been shortlisted for the Brave New Words and Philip K. Dick Awards.
Catherine currently works as a live music lighting designer, teaches women’s self-defense, and is a fan of big cities, long walks, Thai food and graffiti-spotting. She lives in London.

 

The Rest of the Tour

Pursuit of William Abbey blog tour asset 2

Blind Witness – Blog Tour

 

Blind Witness Cover

ratingiconratingiconratingiconratingicon

Blurb:

In 1922 a blind WW1 veteran and former intelligence officer attends a weekend with his aristocratic wife and her family at a country house in the New Forest, Hampshire, England. Fourteen people sit down to dinner on the Friday night; by the end of the weekend there are two murders, an attempted murder and a suicide.
This is book one in a series of humorous murder mysteries and introduces young sleuths The Hon Melissa Charters and her war veteran husband Major Alasdair Charters.
The pair collaborate using Melissa’s powers of observation and Alasdair’s old skills gained in the Secret Intelligence Service to investigate the events unfolding over the weekend. A murder mystery with a spy plot told from many different points of view in the tradition of Simon Brett, M C Beaton and Kerry Greenwood.
Will our investigators discover who is behind the murders?

 

My Review

Hey all, sorry for this being a bit late in the day, but, I can assure you it’s worth the wait, this book was SO MUCH FUN to read. Seriously! The only time I get this crazy about murder mystery books are Agatha Christie ones, so, the fact that I’ve loved this one so much speaks volumes. The Charter Mystery series, promises to be a fantastic one.

I enjoy my murder mysteries with the sort of gusto that I enjoy eating, sooo…A LOT. But that being said, I tend to enjoy them on a rather ‘average’ level, but this one not only kept me intrigued, Goldie’s writing style did such a good job of setting you up in the era that you wouldn’t have known this was written in this decade let alone this century. At the same time, she doesn’t over-clutter with old fashioned language, keeping it solely to the vernacular of the characters which  means you’re not weighed down by prose.

But let’s get to the heart of the matter. You’ve got a fantastically smart aristocratic woman with what seems to be a natural affinity for sleuthing and her husband. The one with the permanent alterations from the war, used to such an independent life and secretive role, finally able to return to what he does best, observations.

The fact that our Mr. Charter doesn’t have eyesight doesn’t deter him and in fact our sleuth uses it to his advantage. He’s living in a time when people sadly equated disabilities like blindness with other assumptions about how their brains work. But, this means they don’t tend to censor what they say within proximity, and when a carefree weekend turns to murder, this point works highly in our ex-Major’s favor as he tries to figure out who the murderer is.

Goldie uses the experiences and knowledge of her husband to write a character that we don’t see often enough; a blind one. There’s no over-exaggeration of the Major’s abilities and the struggle he deals with due tot he fact that he was not always blind and it was a war injury, well, it really hits his experiences home for the reader. She does a good job of conveying his PTSD and feelings on losing his independence in his mind.

The couple work together but without being joined to the hip, they each have their strengths and it’s great to see them separately in action and I really enjoyed that.

The fact that this book opened up with the first case involving their family meant that we were able as readers to get to know a good deal about the background without deterring from the plot and story and I thought this was rather clever of Goldie.

The mystery itself is really well done, I didn’t see that twist, and the tidbits that were used to throw you off the scent were well planted as I didn’t see them for what they were until the last moment. The reveal was exciting and the ending came too quickly in my opinion, it’s such a quick and enjoyable read!

Overall I could gush about this all day but I won’t, just know if you like Agatha Christie, or murder mysteries set in the golden age, I definitely recommend this book to you.

Four HUGE cups of coffee from me!

Thanks to Anne Cater, Vicki Goldie, and Victorina Press for a chance to read and review this honestly as part of the blog tour!

 

About the Author

Vicki Goldie Author pic

Vicki worked as a Chartered Librarian for the Royal National Institute of Blind People and then for the past 19 years in public libraries in Bournemouth and Poole. There she enjoyed arranging and attending writing courses and author events, including such luminaries as Fay Weldon and Peter James. With the Reading Agency and other librarians round the country she reviewed and selected books for The Radio Two Book Club. All the time writing away in her spare time.
Born in California but brought up in England she was introduced to the Golden Age of crime authors at an early age by her mother. She is married to a blind physiotherapist, and it is from his mother, born in a large country house in Devon (now a hotel), educated by governess and with a cut glass voice like the Queen, that she absorbed real life stories about the twenties and thirties.
She has always had a fascination with the Art Deco period and the Golden Age of crime writing. She has been filling her house with Art Deco inspired artefacts and clothing for 40 years. 
Blind Witness is her debut novel and is the beginning of the Charters Mysteries Series featuring Major Alasdair Charters and The Honourable Melissa Charters.

 

The Rest of the Tour

Blind Witness BT Poster

Died and Gone to Devon – Blog Tour

 

 

Died and Gone to Devon

ratingiconratingiconratingicon

GoodReads:
X marks the spot for murder…
In the seaside town of Temple Regis, seagulls are wheeling overhead and the holidays are getting close. And then the body of political candidate Odile Clifford is discovered on the balcony of the lighthouse.
Fearless Riviera Express reporter Judy Dimont goes in search of the killer – but who is it? And where will they strike next?
What’s more, Judy’s position as chief reporter is under threat when her editor takes on hot-shot journalist David Renishaw, whose work is just too good to be true.
Life is busier than ever for Devon’s most famous detective. Can Judy solve the mystery – and protect her position as Temple Regis’s best reporter – before the murderer strikes again?

 

My Review

‘Died and Gone to Devon’ was a cute book a ‘cozy’ murder mystery with a very neat protagonist.

Though I did enjoy reading this, it unfortunately wasn’t for the mystery of it. The murder mystery was lacking for me, it felt as if this were more of a journalist who was living in a quirky town with an enjoyable cast of characters, but, for nearly the first half of the book there was nothing really to do with the mystery part other than an occasional mention.

The buildup was unsatisfying as a mystery, but, I did enjoy learning about the town and the crew of the ‘Riviera.’

Judy is a fun character and overall I would say this was still an enjoyable read and I thought the writing style was the definition of cozy. So, I gave this three stars, but, again, not for it fitting its genre.

One thing I really appreciated in the end was the way the time realistically lapsed, Judy didn’t solve this in two days, it took months for everything to come together and the way it all did mesh was clever and it really was a nice way to end it all.

Overall, it was a three cups of coffee read for me, and I do look forward to hopefully reading the others at some point in this series! [Though this could easily be read as a standalone as I read it]

Thanks so much to BloggerHQ and Harper Collins for a chance to read and review this honestly as part of the tour.

 

The Rest of the Tour

Died and Gone to Devon Blog Tour Banner