The Shadow Prince – Blog Tour

Hey guys, hope everyone is doing alright, I’ll be doing another blog tour post today, yesterday was the last day I needed to spend deep cleaning the old place [and filling in nail holes lol because I love to hang up pictures]. This means more time back on bloghopping and everything else because I won’t be practically comatose by the time I get on my laptop.

Anyway, here we go, on to the good stuff!

The Shadow Prince (Mortal Enchantment, #0.5)

ratingiconratingiconratingicon

Synopsis:

Prequel novella to the award-winning YA fantasy series Mortal Enchantment. Discover a world of elemental powers, courage, duty, sacrifice, forbidden romance and a war for the very elements of life. 

Sixteen-year-old Rowan is an elemental prince. Banished to the mortal world, he doubts he will ever return to Avalon and claim the fire court throne. Until he receives a challenge from his estranged mother. If he slays Kalin, the half-human, half-elemental, princess of the air court, she will abdicate her throne. Is he capable of completing such a heinous task? And what price will he pay if he refuses? 

Perfect for fans of Holly Black and Sarah J. Maas. 

“Filled with betrayal and intrigue, The Shadow Prince is a dark and twisty novella from an exciting new author!” Katee Robert, New York Times and USA Today Bestselling Author

The Shadow Prince is part of the
Mortal Enchantment box set: https://amzn.to/31vk2WN
Book Information:
Title: The Shadow Prince
By Stacey O’Neale
Series #: Mortal Enchantment #0.5
Publication date: March 25th 2014
Genres: Fantasy, Young Adult
GoodReads

Purchase Links

Amazon | B&N | iBooks | Kobo

 

My Review

I love novellas, especially when they’re used as teasers for series and so I definitely enjoyed this one. It was of course a very quick read and got you interested enough to want to read more.

Another thing with novellas though means that there’s not exactly going to be a five paragraph review for it, haha. But it’s not needed.

O’Neale has a nice clear style of writing and her characters and world seem to be very expansive, I want to know more about the Gabriel hounds, the elementals and the different kingdoms, but she gave us enough to satisfy us while reading this…and to automatically make you want to go read ‘Storm Born.’

Rowan’s a sympathetic character, he’s young and isolated from his people and despite how his mother has ruled, he wants to be his own leader and change things for his fire court.

However, will he ever get a chance to be king?

Just when it seems his time to rule has come, Rowan’s given a task. If he slays Kalin though as he’s been ordered, is he really any better than his mother as a leader?

I loved how conflicted he was and also I was immediately intrigued by Kalin.

Hands down though, Rowan’s best friend Marcus was my favorite character, he seemed so loyal and awesome.

Anyway this is a solid intro to a fantasy series and you can bet I’ll be reading ‘Storm Born’ next. Thanks to Xpresso Tours for a copy of the eARC in exchange for my honest opinion.

ButtonXBT (2)

 

Other Books in the Series

MortalEnch

 

About the Author

Stacey

Award-winning author, Stacey O’Neale, lives in Annapolis, Maryland. When she’s not writing, she spends her time fangirling over books, blogging, watching fantasy television shows, cheering for the Baltimore Ravens, and hanging out with her husband and daughter.

Her career in publishing started as a blogger-turned-publicist for two successful small publishers. Stacey writes young adult fantasy and adult science fiction romance. Her books always include swoon-worthy heroes, snarky heroines, and lots of kissing.

Author Links

Website | GoodReads | Facebook | Twitter

 

Giveaway

Win a $25.00 Amazon Giftcard! [INT]
[Click on link above]

 

The Rest of the Tour

TheShadowPrinceTourBanner[Click on picture for the Tour Schedule]

The Birthday House – Blog Tour

 

 

The Birthday House 3D Cover .jpg

ratingiconratingiconratingiconratingicon

BLURB:

The year is 1955, the location picturesque Devon.

In a house by the River Dart, schoolgirl Josephine Kennedy posts invitations to her twelfth birthday party – a party that never takes place.
Horrific violence is committed that night in the family home, leaving all of its occupants dead. 
Based on a disturbing real-life crime, this compelling story explores Josephine’s fate through the prism of friends and family – the victims and survivors who unwittingly influenced the events that led up to the tragedy.
Josephine’s best friend, Susan, is haunted by the secrets of the birthday house. Can she ever find a way of making peace with the past?

Book Information:
Paperback: 150 pages
Publisher: Silverwood Books (24 Jun. 2019)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 178132879X
ISBN-13: 978-1781328798

Purchase Link

Amazon UK

My Review

 

A quick but memorable read. It was a fascinating book, birthed out of the need to deal with grief through fiction, to try and provide answers not freely given in the tragedy that occurred in ‘The Birthday House.’ It’s commendable what Treseder has done in trying to find an explanation, writing a sort of novella in the process. The senseless tragedy that has happened will never have a satisfactory answer or even an answer at all but to try and explain it seems natural as this tragedy will continue to affect those touched by it for the rest of their lives.

I really enjoyed this, Treseder has a strong voice and an impressive style, given that she does it all in 150 pages and makes it end on a satisfying note.

The chapters are divided between the people involved in the story, the young best friends, the parents, and even the housekeeper who stumbled upon the horrible discovery, and this is part of the reason why the book felt so fleshed out and was able to feel complete in my opinion.

Four solid cups of coffee, a great and fast read that will make you stop and think at the end.

Thank you to Silverwood Books and Anne Cater for a copy in exchange for my honest opinion as part of the blog tour.

About the Author

I started writing in a red shiny exercise book when I was seven years old. But in that time and place it was an ‘invalid’ activity, was overlooked, but never went away. It was many years before I felt able to call myself ‘writer’.
But there came a day when the phrase ‘I am a writer’ no longer sounded pretentious, but legitimate, and even necessary. Was it because I had a writing room instead of the corner of a landing? Or because I spent more time writing? Or because I’d got better at it? Or because I get miserable and bad-tempered if I don’t write? Probably a combination of all of the above.
Writing is my third career. The first was as a social worker with children and families, a job I loved, but left because I could no longer cope with the system.
This led to a freelance career as an independent management consultant, helping people to handle emotions in the work context. I worked in the IT industry, in companies large and small, as well as public organisations. Later I became involved in research projects concerned with the multi-disciplinary approach to social problems such as child abuse. So, in a sense, I had come full-circle.
All these experiences feed into the process of writing fiction, while my non-fiction book The Wise Woman Within resulted indirectly from the consultancy work and my subsequent PhD thesis,‘Bridging Incommensurable Paradigms’, which is available from the School of Management at the University of Bath.
I live in Devon and visit Cornwall frequently and these land and seascapes are powerful influences which demand a presence in my writing.
Writers’ groups and workshops are a further invaluable source of inspiration and support and I attend various groups locally and sign up for creative courses in stunning locations whenever I can. I try doing writing practice at home but there is no substitute for the focus and discipline achieved among others in a group.
I have written some short stories and recently signed up for a short story writing course to explore this genre in more depth.
I live with my husband in South Devon and enjoy being involved in a lively local community.

Author Links

Twitter | Website

 

The Rest of the Tour

Final Birthday House BT Poster .jpg

A Different Time – Blog Tour

 

 

Hey guys, there are three blog tour posts today.

Why?

Because I’m an idiot and don’t always remember the tours I sign up for, or apparently the dates for them.

Anyway this first one up is one for part of ‘The Write Reads’ as they’re doing another ultimate blog tour!

GoodReads: 
Keith Nolan falls in love with a remarkable young woman from the past, talking to him on a home video she recorded in 1989. To keep their conversation going, he must find more of her tapes—while forces work against them both, and time is running out.

 

 

My Review

I always love when I can include a book trailer, it’s the inner youtube fanatic in me really shining.

Anyway, this is a sweet little novella that was a nice light read. I mean light enough, if you don’t mind a bit of heartbreak along the way!

The foremost definition of short but sweet!

Keith was a nice protagonist, there was no secret darkness to him, he was well rounded, and I enjoyed that he wasn’t some dark and broody character.

On the same token, I really enjoyed Lindsey, she was a down to earth girl and had some of the best taste in music! [The 80s are calling me now, haha]

While I found it sweet, I wasn’t a fan of the insta-love feel, but I do admit that the way  Hill played everything out made it balance out well enough in my opinion.

Keith and Lindsey are brought together through some logic defying home made tapes from the 80s, Lindsey’s video diary, in which two way communication is somehow possible.

I thought the pacing was great, and enjoyed the switching from between Keith and Lindsey, I just didn’t believe in their love story, but you know what? It was a nice read and it was something that was just perfect to read when you have a couple of hours of your day free and aren’t looking for books with heady and slow paced plots.

I actually enjoyed Hill’s descriptions, they were great at giving you imagery without wasting pages in his novella. Overall, I enjoyed this, and if you’re into a bit of love at first sight and time travel, this book is definitely for you!

Thank you to The Write Reads tour and the publisher and author for a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review!

 

About the Author

Michael K. Hill is an internationally published writer of fiction and non-fiction. His short story collection, Anansi and Beyond, is available now. His novel, A Different Time, publishes July 2, 2019. He lives in Connecticut with his wife, kids, and 7 rescued animals.

Author Website

The Rest of the Tour

ED7tXw4XkAUsSLX

Blitz Writing ARC Review


ratingiconratingiconratingiconratingicon

GoodReads:
Emerging out of the 1940-1941 London Blitz, the drama of these two short works, a novel and a memoir, comes from the courage and endurance of ordinary people met in the factories, streets and lodging houses of a city under bombardment. Inez Holden’s novella Night Shift follows a largely working-class cast of characters for five night shifts in a factory that produces camera parts for war planes. It Was Different At The Time is Holden’s account of wartime life from April 1938 to August 1941, drawn from her own diary. This was intended to be a joint project written with her friend George Orwell (he was in the end too busy to contribute), and includes disguised appearances of Orwell and other notable literary figures of the period. The experiences recorded in It Was Different At The Time overlap in period and subject with Night Shift, setting up a vibrant dialogue between the two texts.
Inez Holden (1903-1974) was a British writer and literary figure whose social and professional connections embraced most of London’s literary and artistic life. She modelled for Augustus John, worked alongside Evelyn Waugh, and had close relationships with George Orwell, Stevie Smith, H G Wells, Cyril Connolly, and Anthony Powell. The introduction and notes are by Kristin Bluemel, exploring how these short prose texts work as multiple stories: of Inez Holden herself, the history of the Blitz, of middlebrow women’s writing, of Second World War fiction, and of the world of work.

Thank you Handheld Press for sending me a review copy, in exchange I’m providing you all with an honest review.

This book was a nice change of pace to my other recent reads. I’m a huge history buff and I had done a lot of WWI and Russian Revolution reading for my nonfiction so to have a change of pace with WWII was great. Not to mention this is a 2 for 1 really, we get Inez Holden’s novella Night Shift along with her wartime memoir, It Was Different At The Time.

Both had their own slice of history to bring to the table, they are both pieces though that are exploring the sort of people that exist in this time period. This isn’t a look at WWII as an event as much as a time period in someone’s life. Holden has a talent for describing people as an outsider that’s a joy to read and the details she provides are unlike other accounts I’ve read. In her novella, she describes the work week, and this includes the machinery that many of us now forget were used to help so much in the war and that was manned quite a bit by women at that point in time. She also recalls things as ‘mundane’ as the buses, and bicycles people used to get around during air raids, and this goes for her memoirs as well.

Oh to be a fly on the wall for Holden’s life, she knew an amazing group of people and thanks to the introduction by Kristin Bluemel we get to know more of what an amazing woman Inez Holden was herself. This is not for reading to get to a plot or experience a satisfying ending, it’s for just plain enjoyment and observation. I can’t say I recall being on the edge of my seat while reading this but I did thoroughly enjoy it for what it was, the small nuances and bits of information were a true delight. I am happy to say that I look forward to reading more about and by Inez Holden.

I would recommend this to any History Buff especially those interested in WWII.

4/5 Cups of Coffee from this caffeine addict! This book will be launched on May 31st at The Second Shelf Bookshop in London!

 

Bloom

This review is going to be done a bit differently!

Today, I will not be giving a rating!

Why? I’m not usually a romance reader and I don’t think this should be constricted to a 1-5 scale as I don’t want that to impact you all on reading it [or not] so today, there shall be no coffee cups or planets!

Blurb: Holly Juniper had no idea she would fall in love with a monster. 

Every winter a mysterious portal appears in her family’s barn. Nothing has ever come out of it, and she barely pays it any mind. Until a woodland nymph named Nia steps through it and into her life. 

Holly is vehemently opposed to her sticking around, not wanting her family play host to a monster, but eventually, Nia grows on her in a way she never expected. 

Over the course of three months, the two fall in love. Despite them both knowing, come spring, Nia will have to return to her world through the portal, and she can never return. 

[Book One in the Monster Love Novella series.]

As I said, I typically don’t read romances but who couldn’t resist one with a female trans protagonist who is completely relatable as a ‘youngin’ in love? Not to mention in love with a Nymph who is the coolest looking nymph I’ve ever heard described.

On a more serious note, you root for Holly the whole time, she’s insecure, she’s shy and drawn into herself from the world and you want her to know she’s worth so much more than she thinks, and Nia does just that and it’s so palpable the way Holly’s insecurities and fears are written. It’s also written in a nice easy going style, you read it as if someone is orally telling it, the dialogue that you would hear from people of that age group (there is some profanity and steamy scenes for those who would like to know this). And I love how much that Holly’s family supports her and clearly love her.

I really want to hit home that I’ve been wanting to diversify my reading, I want to grow as a reader and so I was thrilled to be offered a chance to read this novella that gives us such a great girl as Holly and as I’ve never read a book with a trans character before (don’t worry guys this won’t be my last) this just felt like such a breath of fresh air!

If you’re into romance and wanting to read some urban fantasy mixed in with some slice of life (it’s set on a farm in Pennsylvania) then this is the novella for you!

[I received a copy of this in exchange for my honest review as part of #Reviewpit]

GoodReads Link Here