The BeeKeeper of Aleppo eARC Review


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GoodReads: 
In the midst of war, he found love
In the midst of darkness, he found courage
In the midst of tragedy, he found hope

The Beekeeper of Aleppo

What will you find from his story?

Nuri is a beekeeper; his wife, Afra, an artist. They live a simple life, rich in family and friends, in the beautiful Syrian city of Aleppo – until the unthinkable happens. When all they care for is destroyed by war, they are forced to escape. But what Afra has seen is so terrible she has gone blind, and so they must embark on a perilous journey through Turkey and Greece towards an uncertain future in Britain. On the way, Nuri is sustained by the knowledge that waiting for them is Mustafa, his cousin and business partner, who has started an apiary and is teaching fellow refugees in Yorkshire to keep bees.

As Nuri and Afra travel through a broken world, they must confront not only the pain of their own unspeakable loss, but dangers that would overwhelm the bravest of souls. Above all – and perhaps this is the hardest thing they face – they must journey to find each other again.

Moving, powerful, compassionate and beautifully written, The Beekeeper of Aleppo is a testament to the triumph of the human spirit. Told with deceptive simplicity, it is the kind of book that reminds us of the power of storytelling. 

This book is everything that a modern day work of literature should be. Lefteri has used a heartbreaking time in history to give us this amazing novel; today, the present. Nuri was a beekeeper in Aleppo, but the tragedy of Syria’s civil war has led him and his wife Afra to flee, there is nothing but heartache in Aleppo and Syria, but their journey is long and fraught with peril and the things that today’s society turns its eyes from, refugee camps and the situations of the countries that lead to those camps. Nuri and Afra’s tale is tragic and times and no less than that of our actual Syrian refugees but there is more to it, and who’s to say that the ending isn’t something to uplift your soul? (I’d say more but I’d hate to spoil it) If you’d like a book to reach your heart and soul and grip them tightly, I recommend reading this book which is sure to become a classic of modern literature.

I know I keep saying ‘literature’ but you read this and you think, this is the type of ‘modern’ classic that we need. There is such beauty in looking at the tragedies that through fiction reflect the lives of those living today. It’s so easy to scroll past the news of Syria, to forget about the bad things or focus on other things because there’s so much going on in the world [good and bad] but I just feel like this is a book that should be read, that should be given attention because I could think of nothing greater than to stir compassion through writing and basing it on factual turmoil and tragedy. I have read so many good books in the last couple of months and they’ve all be different, they all offer something that I didn’t know I needed until I read it and I get if this isn’t your sort of genre but if it is, and you find yourself intrigued in the slightest, please go look it up.

I can’t even put into words how this book moved me, everything seems pale and inadequate when I try to type it up. I am excited because I’ll be going to Edinburgh to listen to Christy Lefteri talk about The Beekeeper of Aleppo on May 6, and I’ll update you all about that.

The release date for this book is May 2, 2019

I received this book from Zaffre Books via NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.

3 thoughts on “The BeeKeeper of Aleppo eARC Review”

  1. Oh wow, I totally lost out by skipping out on this arc!! I looked at it but I had so much to read and thought it might not deliver based on the synopsis… but it sounds like it is a wonderful novel and I am going to have to double check it out again D: I love books which read as ‘modern day classics’ as you put it. Those are often favourites of mine 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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