Cymera #1

Hey guys!

So, Cymera was awesome! I was pretty brief in my appearance, I went on Saturday to my two events and had to rush off to meet up with my friend who had so kindly went about on her own in Edinburgh -her first time too- as she knew I was super excited about this festival.

Let me just say this was a delightful experience and there was so much that I took away in the short span of time of my attendance.

First off everyone was so nice and helpful and friendly! I mean everyone! From volunteers, to writers, to fellow regular/blogger attendees, to the amazing authors! So thank you so much to those who put so much work and effort into Cymera Festival and I can’t wait for the next one.

The small setting was perfect, you really got to feel a sort of intimacy between the other attendees, yourself, and the authors and their wonderful chair peeps! I could not say enough good things!

The only complaint I have is with the weather, Edinburgh, you let me down lolol, thankfully I come prepared for our typical summer/spring showers and my books were safely wrapped up in my backpack to avoid getting damaged.

Instead of just giving you all a run down, I really want to delve into what the authors were talking about and the questions brought forth to them as they would make some excellent conversation posts for us all!

I am trying to give you a small summary for now though as you can see by my gushing about the festival and the lament of the weather. I was well prepared for it as said though, and I was really thankful that there was a Blackwell’s bookshop open. I brought my own books but I still ended up coming home with a couple.

There were readings by well known and emerging authors, there was gathering, there was coffee [alas the line was too long and this well known caffeinated reader was without caffeine] and there were books. What more could a reader ask for?

Well my first discussion piece will be on Thursday, and we’re going to take a look at what our authors and chair speaker Lesley Glaister, Eris Young, and Alexandra Christo had to say about mythical creatures.

But more importantly, we’re going to see how they view the categorization of monsters and creatures and how they differentiate from humans, and what makes humans..human? Why do we call it humanity and is it possible for a monster to be more human than one of us?

Find out Thursday!!

 

 

Cymera Coming Up!

If you all remember I signed up to volunteer for Cymera Festival in Edinburgh, I didn’t get a chance to this year -hopefully, I will next year!- but I am still attending!

This picture is their logo, I had nothing to do with it, please no one sue me!

Who am I going to see?

Mythical Creatures With…

I’m going to see Alexandra Christo, author of To Kill a Kingdom and Lesley Glaister, author of Aphra’s Child for my first event which is chaired by Eris Young, Sarah Marie Griffin was going to attend this event as well but she’s unable to, however, it’s still a fantastic lineup!

My other event is…

Samantha Shannon: Priory of the Orange Tree

Samantha Shannon, chaired by Akemi Dawn Bowman! I’m so excited for this one as well! There were so many I wanted to go to and I’m still going to try and head to a couple of more last minute so I can try and score stuff for friends from authors they wanted!

I really hope I can, my friends are amazing and they deserve some goodies from authors!

Seriously, speaking of, go check out Michelle’s blog at Michelle Likes Things because she’s amazing and so is her blog and she made my week this week. That is all.

If you’re a book blogger/reader/writer or just going to Cymera please feel free to say hi to me! [I’ll be the one with the very poofy dark auburn hair and resting bitch face while clutching my copies of Priory and TKAK.

I won’t be able to post about the actual festival until Sunday as Saturday night I’m going out with my friend who is here and the hubs.

Speaking of the hubs, this is a bit off topic but he’s awesome, he found Vol. 2 of George Buchanan’s memoirs, a British diplomat in Russia around the time of the Revolution, I had vol. 1 but didn’t even know how to find vol. 2!

The House on Rosebank Lane eARC Review


ratingiconratingiconratingiconratingicon

GoodReads Blurb: 

Edinburgh, 1953.

Kirsten Mowat, eighteen years old and with a joyful spring in her step, couldn’t be more in love with her sea-faring sweetheart Duncan Armstrong.

But, seven years later – after a hasty wedding, a twist of lies and wrenching loss – Duncan and Kirsten’s relationship has faded to tatters. When those closest to her turn their backs, Kirsten – alone, with a young family to care for – must gather all her spirit and strength if they are to survive.

From much-loved Millie Gray, The House on Rosebank Lane is an Edinburgh story of families entwined, of sorrow and hopefulness . . . and of a young mother’s love for her children and a transforming quest for happiness.

Millie Gray does a great job giving us a look back at Edinburgh through the 50s toward the 70s, not only that but she gives you a truly heartstring tugging and simultaneously heartwarming tale of not just one woman but the others in her life. At first, I found it difficult to feel sympathy for Kirsten but that soon changed once you saw the radiance of her love as a mother. After that, I may not have approved of everything she did or didn’t do, but I gained respect for our main protagonist. I also greatly enjoyed the look back into the pasts of some of the other characters. Kirsten’s love for a mother isn’t just radiant but it’s real, she makes mistakes and deals with lasting consequences but you never once question the fact that she loved her children, and I think that’s what really drew me to this story, the heart of it all. You wanted to cheer them on, Kirsten, Dixie, Stella, Eddie, Jane, even Jessie! I was not expecting this to make me tear up, but it did and it was a satisfying read that I really didn’t want to put down until I’d finished it.

I would recommend for anyone who reads these sort of heartwarming and tear-inducing tales, Millie Gray has certainly done a brilliant job with it!

The object of this story wasn’t the romance but that did fit in nicely [and a good ‘slow burn’ if I may!] it was about the love of Motherhood, and even a bit of Fatherhood at one part. I can honestly say I don’t usually want to read ‘mushy’ or emotional reads but I wanted to read this one as it was a story located in Edinburgh.

This doesn’t drag on, and I think one of my few complaints besides that I didn’t always like Kirsten (and I wouldn’t say that was a complaint) was that I felt it was unresolved where Stella was concerned but I still greatly enjoyed it. I cried a little, got exasperated, sighed in frustration and smiled at the end. Makes for a pretty great read if you ask me.